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Global Russians Presentation at Russian Pavilion at Cannes Global Russians Presentation at Russian Pavilion at CannesOn May 22nd, 2017, as part of the 70th Festival de Cannes and Marché Du Film market, the Russian Pavilion hosted a presentation of the annual short-film anthology Global Russians. The Pavilion visitors saw five selections: Gala Shiyan's "Amnesia"; Olga Dibtseva's "Good Day"; Petr Antokhin's "Breaking Up with Jenny"; Lado Kvataniya's "The First"; and Daria Vlasova's "Milk."The program had been handpicked by an expert jury comprising film critics Vasiliy Koretsky (Colta.ru, Vogue), Katya Mtsitouridze (Roskino, Channel 1), and Denis Ruzaev (Lenta.ru, TimeOut.ru).The Global Russians contest invites submissions from students and alumni of film schools, both Russian and international. This year, over 170 applications had been received, and the final roster included works by both aspiring filmmakers fresh out of film school, and emerging talent already known in the industry. In terms of production budget, the program picks range from inexpensive original skits to price tags considered fairly high for a short subject.All five Global Russians shorts, thanks to Roskino, will go on to represent their country in the Cannes sidebar Short Film Corner, where industry professionals will evaluate them. Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO:"We put together our annual Global Russians program in hopes of launching new, exciting, and envelope-pushing careers. The fact that our alumnus, Kantemir Balagov, is now unveiling his debut feature "Closeness" in the prestigious Un Certain Regard program, speaks to the success of our mission. Two years ago, Kantemir's short "Me First" was a Global Russians finalist, which gave him the opportunity to go to Cannes with other students from Alexander Sokurov's workshop at the Kabardino-Balkaria State University. We are delighted to see his unqualified triumph. This year, the jury's decisions were mostly unanimous. The weak entries were quickly dismissed, so we had to choose from the 20 most promising offers. As it stands, the final five show great range in style and tone, and their authors, I'm sure, won't take long to break through with their first features."Vasiliy Koretsky, film critic, Colta.ru and Vogue Russia:"There are a few simple criteria we stuck to in evaluating the submissions. The first one is watchability. Young filmmakers often rely on text too heavily. In an international program, the visuals should be more pronounced than the story itself. The story, meanwhile, should be easy to read in the subtitles or, ideally, told with no verbal crutches whatsoever. Second of all, we singled out the genre works. Genre movies are not exactly thriving in Russia, although we've made some progress in comedy. What's important here is that comedy have crossover potential, not tied to the specifics of the Russian context. Third of all, the running time: we made it a point to intersperse the lengthier films in the program with brief skits. And finally, we assessed the professional level of the authors and their work."Denis Ruzaev, film critic, Lenta.ru and TimeOut.ru:"Filmmakers of today often try to squeeze all they know about life, people, and their country into a 15-20-min. running time (30 at best). Of course, it's an impossible task, and few directors accomplish that even in their features. As we sifted through the submissions, we mostly looked for concise, witty, and consistent stories told with coherence and elegance."Global Russians Program 2017«Amnesia»Directed by Gala ShiyanStarring Dmitry Erokhin, Alexander Levitsky, Ivan Kozin, Sergei Sychugov, Maxim VintovkinA one-minute sketch of the contemporary poetry scene, "Amnesia" is the program's most laconic selection, in which a nervous poet dares to present his work to his colleagues for the first time, and forgets his own stanzas under pressure.The film was born out of improvisation. At a poetry reading, Dmitry Erokhin (John Vain) added to his famous verses a "recently written" poem entitled "Amnesia," which inspired the filmmaker, Gala Shiyan, who now says, "What happened there made me think about our perception of contemporary art, and the tricky situations it creates––for example, when a green EXIT sign on the wall may or may not be an element of the exhibit."The movie was filmed quickly, with non-professional actors playing themselves. We get to see a real poetry reading "At Vain's," where he and other poets play along following the director's lead.Before she enrolled in Yuri Grymov's class at Wordshop Academy, Gala Shiyan had already earned two degrees, in engineering and philosophy. While in school for the latter, she started making film études and shorts. Her résumé now lists a dozen independently produced films, including "One on One," "Triangles," "The Silver Medal" etc. "To be perfectly honest, I thought my film would only be understood by the people involved in its production, i.e. the poets themselves. I'm as amazed that it has garnered so much attention as I am honored to present it here. Our whole production budget was 200 rubles to rent a lavalier mic and some small change for parking. My films have traveled to international festivals before, but never on this scale, obviously. I realize full well that I'm as lucky as my characters, and it just takes my breath away," admits the director.Vasiliy Koretsky:"We have considered several super-short miniatures, and "Amnesia" is my personal favorite. Once you've had enough of turgid arthouse fare, such a brisk and funny story truly feels like a breath of fresh air."«Good Day»Directed and produced by Olga DibtsevaStarring Alexander Pal, Olga Khokhlova, Vasiliy Kortukov, Galina Averyanova, Andrei Kharybin, Pavel Serdyuk"Good Day" is actress Olga Dibtseva's directorial debut. It is her first completed assignment for the Filmmaking preparatory course at the Moscow Film School.This tersely humorous project, now with a bit of gallows humor, tells the simple story of a delivery boy who, on an errand for a married couple, witnesses a series of accidental deaths. The delivery boy is played by Alexander Pal in what the selection committee believes to be his career-best performance."I'm so happy to be here, and I would like to thank Roskino for this opportunity, and everyone else who helped this movie succeed. "Good Day" is my directorial debut. I'm an actress, but I've always wanted to direct. All the accomplished filmmakers tell you to just do it, because making a movie has never been easier. So, I wrote the script and assembled crew and cast who were all my friends willing to work for free. My own apartment was our set, and I borrowed a camera from a colleague, so the entire budget came out to about 50,000 rubles. The hardest part was bringing all the extremely busy actors to the set for two days, and the biggest chunk of the budget was eaten up by the logistics of it all. Of course, Alexander Pal is the crown jewel of the movie. I didn't even think he'd be interested in a student project, but he liked the screenplay and said yes right away," says the director.Olga Dibtseva is about to graduate from Boris Khlebnikov and Aleksey Popogrebskiy's workshop at the Moscow Film School. She is currently shooting her final project, a comedy about a female doctor who befriends a lady from the wealthy suburbs of Moscow.Vasiliy Koretsky: "We all loved this film, and chose it unanimously! It's a simple story that can be comprehended with no words at all, although the funny dialogue is an added bonus. It's an actors' movie, too, and Pal's participation is symbolic here: it's a new Russian comedy that I feel was somewhat influenced by Zhora Kryzhovnikov." «Breaking Up with Jenny»Directed by Petr AntokhinProduced by Nodar Dzhincharadze, Petr AntokhinStarring Dustin Chaviano"Breaking Up with Jenny" is the program's sole English-language title. According to Petr Antokhin, "the language is as instrumental here as are lighting, lenses, music, and special effects. This story simply sounds more organic when told in English." Overall, the film doesn't feel Russian at all, since the images, sets, and props all look distinctly Western.The film's main, and only, character is a guy named Gus, who is having a very special morning: he's marrying Rachel in a couple of hours. The one minor thing he has to take care of is break up with Jenny. Jenny is the name of his car, but this information is withheld for a while as Gus, in an internal monologue, struggles to convince himself he's making the right choice and fends off an avalanche of texts from his domineering bride. A truly masculine tale!This is a live-action debut for Petr Antokhin, a graduate of the Contemporary Art Institute (V.D. Rubinchik's workshop). Previously, he has collaborated with other filmmakers on the TV show "Love Is Not What It Seems.""I decided to start with the most doable thing––a screenplay I could manage within my budget. For a couple of months, I would meet my filmmaker friends and gush on and on about this guy who has a very special relationship with his car. First I "infected" my co-producer Nodar Dzhincharadze, then my cameraman Sergey Pavlenko and unit production manager Igor Kapustin. At some point, the film took on a life of its own. Frankly speaking, I wasn't even thinking about my movie's prospects. I just wanted to see my idea come to life. For the opportunity to present it here today, I'd like to thank Nodar, the whole crew, and our actor Dustin Chaviano," says Petr Antokhin.Dustin Chaviano, the film's star, is also a newcomer. The director says he auditioned his actors in a cafe and understood right away that Dustin was perfect for this role. Chaviano, meanwhile, threatened to go away on a long trip around the world if he were not cast.Vasiliy Koretsky: "The story of a young man who ditches his bride for a car made quite an impression on me. Perhaps it won't look so refreshing in the global context as it did among Russian films that repeat the same mistakes over and over again, and dash their own hopes for festival recognition. Anyway, the movie is an interesting one, funny and high-quality." «The First»Directed by Lado Kvataniya Produced by Ekaterina Kononenko Starring Maria Krylova, Vladimir VerevochkinThe Global Russians' longest and most epic selection is directed by Lado Kvataniya, already an established name in the industry. He graduated from the Russian Academy of Theater Arts with a degree in acting and studied screenwriting under John Truby; he also went to New York Film Academy, where Paul Brown served as his supervisor. A Hype Productions employee and Ilya Naishuller's frequent collaborator, Kvataniya has made several music videos for his band Biting Elbows and starred in "Hardcore Henry."The short is set in the Soviet Union in 1960. A capsule with an astronaut inside crash-lands in the woods, soon to be found by a lonely village girl. The astronaut doesn't know yet that his biggest test still lies ahead.Andrei Koroteev's script is based on a British article that throws the accepted historical narrative into question and doubts whether Yuri Gagarin was the first man in space. Criticized in some quarters as a Cold War relic, the article has nevertheless inspired this cinematic fantasia, in which the director speculates about how his parents could have met each other."Thank you, ROSKINO, for giving me the opportunity to be at this splendid event. I had a spiritual experience yesterday when I shook Park Chan-wook's hand, so I'm ecstatic right now," says Lado Kvataniya. "In my film, I tried to articulate a certain interpretation of being. Different philosophies and religious movements have different cosmologies, and they all ponder the same question: who is our creator, our father? The man whom we don't get to see in the movie––the invisible narrator, the protagonists' son––interprets his own origins. I tried to tell a non-hermetic tale, accessible to anyone in the world."Vasiliy Koretsky:"It's an intriguing genre piece of the highest production values. Not that I only appreciate big-budget filmmaking and spurn little indies––the Cannes festival has seen it all. Besides, the movie engages with the space theme ironically, without the customary pompousness. As far as the theme itself is concerned, the program had to have, shall we say, a Russian doll: something that "speaks" Russian without an accent."«Milk»Directed by Daria Vlasova Produced by Yanna BuryakStarring Vitaliy Khodin, Maria Bolonkina, Gleb Orlov, Yaroslava Bazaeva, Igor YasulovichAnother relatively big-budget selection (two million rubles), which has already been to a prestigious international festival: it premiered at the 67th Berlinale, in the Short Films Generation 14 Plus sidebar.Made by a VGIK alumna, Daria Vlasova, "Milk" thrusts the viewer into a downright bizarre situation. Imagine a 14th-floor apartment in a major city. A perfect family: mother, father, daughter, and son. One fine morning, a live cow is found in their kitchen. The family members get used to it soon, except for the grandfather (Yasulovich) who's hell-bent on killing the animal.The filmmaker told us about the inception of her idea:"About two years ago, I had this vision of a cow in the kitchen, and my imagination filled in the blanks. When I set out to do something funny, I use surreal, absurdist imagery. The movie's aesthetic had to be as antiseptic and ad-like as possible. I tried to explore the issues of contemporary society using a universal visual language: that's why it's light on dialogue. A big thank-you goes to my producer Yanna Buryak, who gave me a chance to create without thinking about the budget."It wasn't easy to find a 14th-floor apartment where a cow would be welcome: about 100 people had refused to let the producers use their kitchen, and those few who were willing demanded an amount of money enough to rent a soundstage. A special set was built for the "main character," a cow named Murka."During preproduction, we brainstormed all the possible scenarios of our cow's behavior, and built the sets and planned our schedule accordingly. We had anticipated every conceivable disruption. But Murka is an experienced actor, so everything went smoothly as she wasn't afraid of either the lights or the people around her," stressed Daria.Denis Ruzaev:"It's a clever futuristic joke. The cow provokes all kinds of emotions in the family members. No one knows where she came from. I liked how the filmmakers, through artistic means only, added a fantastic dimension to her story, as though the cow were an alien from outer space." Traditionally held at the Russian Pavilion in Village International, Global Russians presentations draw sizeable crowds of Russian and international producers, sales agents, distributors, investors, and festival curators. It gives emerging filmmakers a chance to be discovered and take the decisive leap in their careers.The Global Russians project was initiated by Roskino in 2011. Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO, is the project's author and curator. Each year, Roskino selects the best short films made in Russia. In the last five years, over 30 films have premiered at Cannes, including shorts by Zhora Kryzhovnikov, Taisia Igumentseva, Ilya Uchitel, Timofey Zhalnin, Anton Bilzho etc. The list of guest curators includes screenwriter and director Aleksey Chupov, film scholar Viktor Prokofiev, producers Ivan Lopatin and Dimitri Yakunin.  

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RUSSIAN PAVILION AT CANNES PRESENTS “OKAY, MUM” On May 21st, 2017, as part of the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the Russian Pavilion hosted a showcase for writer Eva Lanska's directorial debut, the social drama entitled "Okay, Mum." Intended as a draft for the upcoming eponymous feature, the film inaugurates a short-subject series devoted to relationships between parents and children. Made in Great Britain and starring British actors, the film tackles the issue of child abuse.The plot of “Okay, Mum” is centered around Natasha, a 12-year-old girl forced to survive, rather than live, in her own family while her parents are constantly at each other’s throats. The father takes it out on the child, and the mother does nothing to prevent it. The girl appeals to her mother, but her cries for help remain unheard. A sensitive and imaginative child, she suffers all the more for it as her terrifying visions make her stay at home unbearable. As a grown woman, Natasha goes to great lengths to avoid following in her parents’ footsteps and to forget her childhood, but ends up making the same mistakes, and her internal dialogue with her mother continues on. The film allows the viewer to filter a family conflict through a child’s consciousness. Although "Okay, Mum" tells a child's story, it has been rated 16+ and is intended, primarily, for adults.Eva Lanska, director:"Childhood memories are the sweetest, most vivid, most tender. But everything changes when children are forced to grow up too soon. In our film, the camera "stands for" the child's eye, and we see the outside world through this prism. It’s obvious that a story like that could’ve happened anywhere. For a kid, there’s nothing worse than her parents’ divorce, their squabbles, the physical and emotional violence inflicted in the family. It’s impossible to see what goes on behind the closed doors in each family, but we do have the power to address the issue through art and thus influence the most hard-hearted parents. A Russian Pavilion presentation is, first and foremost, our international mouthpiece that calls the attention of people around the world to the problem of emotional violence suffered by children in their own families."Natasha's parents are played by British actors Sam Redford, known for his roles in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, The Hurt Locker, and K-19, and Gina Bramhill, who previously appeared on TV in Mr. Selfridge and in an episode of Sherlock. Little Natasha herself is played by Eleanor Stagg, who, despite her age, has already worked with Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard in Macbeth, and with Drew Barrymore in Miss You Already.  Eva Lanska, director:"I've never seen such a tight-knit team, and I was really impressed by their discipline. The cast and crew grew into a unified whole for the duration of the shoot. The British actors are responsible and highly professional, and generally have it together. Sam Redford had to play the complex part of a crazed, despotic father who tortures his own child. Since the most painful injuries are to be found within, he prepared for his role by studying psychology with great care. Of course, these emotions are not typical for him, but he would get in character in no time––and most importantly, he knew how to deal with young Eleanor. Though she's a professional actress, she's still a child, and a ballerina at that, so her worldview is pretty fragile. She's a talented and, what I valued even more, a genuine girl: she remains her wonderful self even when she's acting." Aided by Alex Marx who played the lawyer in the film and produced it, Eva Lanska is currently at work on a screenplay for the feature version of her short. In addition to that, Lanska has written several screenplays about parent-child relationships. According to her, these stories are meant to spotlight the consequences of parents and educators not having enough information on child-rearing. "If we can convince one person to stop and think about their child's problems, then it's all worth it," says the director.Alex Marx, producer:"As soon as Eva shared her idea with me I knew I wanted to be a part of it. The issues brought up in her film are as timely as ever, and Eva has a lot of first-hand knowledge on the subject, because she's been doing volunteer work for years and gathering information all the while. Mind you, Russia is not the only country where child abuse is a hot-button issue: it's just as relevant to Great Britain where I live. It wouldn't be an overstatement to call the theme we explore a universal one."A screen- and prose writer, as well as a filmmaker, Eva Lanska graduated from the Lomonosov Moscow State University with a degree in journalism. Afterwards, she went on to study directing and acting at the Moscow Art Theater and London Film Academy. With three years of television work in Russia under her belt and vast experience in music videos gained in Paris, she now produces her own TV content and documentaries in England.Eva Lanska has also made a name for herself as an activist. As a member of the international public organization Union of Social Child Services, she traveled Russia in 2010-13 on a volunteer basis, lending children from state-owned orphanages financial and moral support and raising awareness about child abuse through media channels. Lanska claims that over the years she has accumulated enough material for several films, which she now wants to direct.   Additional info:Jane KovalenkoROSKINO Press Office info@ekovalenko.com+7 916 131 10 00

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Moscow Film Commission Presented at Russian Pavilion at Cannes On May 20th, 2017, as part of the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the Russian Pavilion hosted a presentation of the Moscow Film Commission. Meant to promote Moscow as a shooting location and to make the city more attractive for Russian and international filmmakers, the project was introduced by Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture; Evgeny Gerasimov, Head of the Commission for Culture and Mass Communications at the Moscow City Duma; Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO; and producer Igor Ugolnikov. Among their foreign colleagues invited to the event were Arie Bohrer, Head of Advisory Board, European Film Commission Network; Valérie Lépine-Karnik, CEO of Film France, the French Film Commission; Michel Plazanet, Deputy Director for European and International Affairs at CNC; Marijana Stoisits, Vice-chairwoman for AFCI and Head of the Vienna Film Commission; and Sigmund Elias Holm, Vice-chairman of AFCI (Association of Film Commissioners International) and Head of the West-Norwegian Film Commission. As they shared their experiences, the esteemed guests explained the importance of establishing film commissions in major cities, and expressed their confidence in the Moscow Film Commission to boost both film and tourism industries and to join AFCI in the foreseeable future. As it stands, every year sees a new drop in film shootings in Moscow: over the last five years, the numbers have decreased by half, from 80 to 40. The main reason lies in the numerous administrative obstacles directors and producers are forced to overcome. This is why the decision has been made to institute a commission tasked with enticing filmmakers, both local and international, to the streets of Moscow––a recently transformed city that holds great potential as a shooting location. The Moscow Film Commission will be a part of the Moscow City Council, operating through the Department of Culture and Moscow Cinema––an institution that curates the development of local film theaters and various film projects around the city. The Commission will process requests and provide consulting and organizational assistance; it will also provide information on shooting locations and production companies that may help coordinate a shoot in Moscow. From now on, all filming requests both from Russian and foreign filmmakers, as well as all the necessary permits, will be handled by the same office. Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture:"In today's world, the largest European city of 20 million population can no longer limit itself to preserving its cultural heritage––it is equally important to develop creative and cultural economies, too. In this regard, cinema is the most effective and rewarding direction to pursue. Over the next five years, we want to see Moscow on movie screens around the globe, and we're sparing no effort to make our city film-friendly, both for locals and foreigners. Our goal is to create as hospitable an environment for filmmakers as possible. To that end, we have to overcome the administrative barriers that get in the way of producers and directors. At the moment, in order to organize a shoot in the city, you have to get your project vetted, approved, and rubber-stamped by over 30 agencies of all kinds. Drawing on the experience of other global cities, we have created our Film Commission, a transparent structure headed by none other than Deputy Mayor Leonid Pechatnikov. The help lent by the Commission will be "wholesale," ranging from visa issues to shooting permits to location approval to blocking filming areas and hiring extras. That being said, the lowest prices are both offered and guaranteed." Some services rendered by the Moscow Film Commission: ●      Shooting permits in the city (up to 30 days);●      Organizational assistance (you should expect a response within one business day). One of the goals set by the Commission is to grant filmmakers access to notoriously "difficult" locations, some of them as iconic as the Kremlin, the Bolshoi Theater etc.;●      Assistance with location scouting (recommendations provided in seven days; estimated cost in 21 days);●      Recommending authorized production companies (a list of production companies provided in seven days). Since such a project cannot run smoothly without certain legal adjustments, it is vital that the initiative is supported directly by the Moscow City Council (Duma).  Evgeny Gerasimov, Head of the Commission for Culture and Mass Communications at the Moscow City Duma:"First of all, let me remark that the cultural budget of Moscow has been steadily growing lately. Improving the image of our city is one of our priorities. Filmmakers have been telling us for a long time that the filming situation in Moscow must be improved, and we have heard them. Having secured support from the Department of Culture and Mayor of Moscow, we are now willing to run the gamut from obtaining permits to hiring extras and caterers. It is also important that the lawmakers from the City Council are open to considering new legislature as needed. We are happy to have ROSKINO on board promoting a better image of Moscow––a truly deserving destination, whether we speak of the old town or contemporary cityscape."  Another initiative directed at improving the city's image will be the Mayor's annual prize "For portraying Moscow in film." Among the current contenders are films made over the last five years and set in present-day Moscow, where the city itself is central to the plot. Nine projects have been shortlisted so far, based on two criteria: their portrayal of Moscow and artistic merit. The prize fund of 100 million rubles will be divided threeways, with 50 going to the winner, and 30 and 20, respectively, to the two runners-up. The award will be presented by Mayor of Moscow Sergey Sobyanin at the 39th Moscow IFF. Throughout the year 2017, ROSKINO has been promoting the Moscow Film Commission at the leading international film markets and festivals. Their collaboration with the Moscow City Council and the Department of Culture began with the idea to create an agency that would stimulate film production in the Russian capital, aimed at international as well as domestic crews.     Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO:"A special thank you goes out to Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin. I'd also like to share my experience of interacting with him––a completely anti-bureaucratic experience, mind you, which is so rare to come by when you deal with state officials. I took up my suggestion with the City Council. Once I told them about the international commissions' accomplishments, and presented detailed information on how these mechanisms worked in other cities to attract film crews and encourage tourism, the Mayor immediately greenlit the project. In two weeks, the initiative was well underway. Sergey Sobyanin has helped us in a lot of ways, and we truly appreciate it." Igor Ugolnikov, Producer:"I'm certain that Moscow will not only be portrayed in foreign films as it deserves to be portrayed––it will also boost the production of Russian movies meant for domestic and international audiences. The film community will certainly benefit from the joint efforts of such prominent structures as ROSKINO and Moskino. I hope that next year we'll be able to gather at the Russian Pavilion again to discuss the first fruits of our labor." The architects of the Commission have taken into account their international colleagues' achievements along with the feedback received from professional organizations, producers, and film directors. The guests at the presentation detailed the work of similar commissions in other countries and suggested vectors for future development to the Moscow Film Commission, which, as they hope, should soon become a member of AFCI. Michel Plazanet, Deputy Director for European and International Affairs at CNC:"Launching a project like the Moscow Film Commission seems to me an important step taken by the Russian film industry. If France, where the government systematically subsidizes national cinema, is any indication, it's a win-win for all concerned: both the film community and the audiences. The added bonus is the thriving of tourism and advancement of local culture. A film commission is a complicated mechanism, but it's crucial that these developments be encouraged. We're happy to see film commissions cropping up in Russia, a huge country with no small creative potential. On our end, we're ready to share our years of experience in this area to maximize the efficiency of the Moscow Film Commission." Arie Bohrer, Head of Advisory Board, European Film Commission Network:"I wholeheartedly support your initiative to get the Moscow Film Commission off the ground. Russia is a part of Europe. There was a time when major European cities didn't quite see eye to eye, but eventually those disagreements were ironed out once France, Italy, and Austria decided to join their efforts, and now their film commissions are frequent collaborators. With that in mind, let me point out that the Moscow Film Commission means more to us than a commission of, say, Hawaii or Tokyo. Moscow belongs to the shared European space, and all European countries should stick together. We're happy to welcome our Moscow friends in our midst. Now you are card-carrying European filmmakers!"  Valérie Lépine-Karnik, CEO of Film France, the French Film Commission:"Mission Impossible 6 is currently filming in France, and we couldn't be happier about it because it's our chance to advertise France globally––a mass sendout, as it were, of postcards with pictures of our country. The French Film Commission consists of 40 regional subdivisions, each working on popularizing its town and contributing to the positive image of the country as a whole, which helps us pique the interest of filmmakers from abroad. Other recent big-budget productions filmed in France include Christopher Nolan's WWII epic Dunkirk (it filmed up north) and the TV show Riviera, presented at the TV market MIPTV and already aired in Great Britain. The more foreign projects are filmed in a country, the better off are its culture, economy, and tourism. The more locales end up on TV and film, the better. I'm glad that Russia has come to this realization as well and formed the Moscow Film Commission. I'm sure it'll pay off soon enough." Marijana Stoisits, Vice-Chairwoman for AFCI and Head of the Vienna Film Commission:"I'm so happy that Moscow now has a film commission of its own. I love this city, and I'd like to see it in the movies more often. I hope the Commission proves effective and promptly joins the Association of Film Commissioners International (AFCI), which I represent." Frank Priot, International Consultant for the Moscow Film Commission:"It is my deepest conviction that every major city in the world should have its own film commission. Moscow is an amazing city, and the tourists shouldn't be the only ones aware of that––it should be shown to moviegoers all over the world. Furthermore, this city is capable of providing a great number of various locales. The project developed by the Department of Culture and Moscow Cinema is more than a mere film commission: it's a crucial tool in cultural promotion. In order to increase the number of film projects, you need to increase the transparency of the system, for instance, by creating an informative and user-friendly website. Once the system is allowed to run smoothly, it incentivizes filmmakers to choose the city as their shooting location: at least, this is how it works in France. It simply puzzles everyone when a city doesn't have a film commission of its own. Now that a commission has been created in Moscow, I'm sure the international prestige of the Russian capital will grow exponentially."  Call for applications to film in Moscow opens on May 20th. Over the summer 2017, the Moscow Film Commission will operate in test mode while the process is perfected. Russian applicants should include information about their project (title, country of origin, brief description, names of director, producer, and production company), the shooting period (timeline, storyboards, number of participants, brief description of the scene for each object, equipment data, animals on the set, number of parking spaces), and contact info. For international companies, a brief description of the project will be sufficient.  The Moscow Film Commission website is already up and running, complete with application forms and contacts:  http:filmmoscow.com Applications should be sent to mfc@mos-kino.ru or filmmoscow@mos-kino.ru. The Russian delegation's presence at the Cannes Film Festival is managed by ROSKINO with the support of the Russian Ministry of Culture and Moscow City Council. Strategic partnership provided by PJSC Aeroflot – Russian Airlines.    Additional info:Jane KovalenkoROSKINO Press Office info@ekovalenko.com+7 916 131 10 00

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Serj Tankian of Iconic System of a Down Highlighted at Russian Pavilion Presentation On May 19th, 2017, as part of the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the Russian Pavilion hosted a presentation of the new projects from Central Partnership. Rafael Minasbekyan, KIT CEO; Pavel Stepanov, Central Partnership CEO; and Dzhanik Fayziev, KIT Studio General Producer, unveiled their large-scale historical blockbuster "Furious" and played some new footage showcasing the high quality of the film's visual effects. Serj Tankian, the lead singer of the iconic band System of a Down, has joined the project as a composer. The musician has long dreamed of scoring an epic movie, and "Furious" marks his first collaboration with a Russian filmmaker."For several months now, I've been working on a score for the epic blockbuster "Furious." I've been dreaming of a project like this for years: to blend together a big orchestra, crazy rock music, and ethnic motifs. In this sense, my dream has come true. I can say with some confidence that I'm terribly proud of the music I've composed for this film," says Serj Tankian.Six themes have been created, some of them electronic. The instrumental parts will be recorded by System of a Down separately. The score should be finished by the end of the summer.Dzhanik Fayziev, director and producer, KIT Studio: "Serj Tankian may be the only musician in the world who knows how to fuse seamlessly modern rhythms and ultimate tenderness. He has fashioned an original score that can rival the best examples of its kind. It should also be noted that the music he has recorded for the movie sounds even better than the music we used as reference points."Rafael Minasbekyan, KIT CEO:"We're proud and happy that an internationally renown musician of has agreed to work on our movie. It's been a pleasure working with Serj. I'm sure that this project is just the first one in a long series of our future collaborations." "Furious" is the first historical epic to tell of the martial exploits undertaken by the Ryazan military leader Evpatii Kolovrat. The setting is the 13th-century Kievan Rus', a fractured state about to be defeated by Batu Khan of the Golden Horde. As they burn down the cities and flood Russian land with blood, the plunderers meet no organized resistance until a brave soldier challenges them at last. Evpatii Kolovrat, a knight from the town of Ryazan, leads the charge to avenge his love and his Motherland, with a platoon of daredevils behind him. His courage will win even Batu Khan's grudging respect, and the hero's name will be forever imprinted in national memory. It was the filmmakers' intention to forego an accurate portrayal of 13th-century history; instead, they chose to fashion a fairytale world of their own. Rafael Minasbekyan, KIT CEO:"This project is very important for us, and the stakes are pretty high. We feel that we've made a beautiful, elegant, gripping, and inspiring movie. In order to unlock the potential of "Furious," we're setting in motion a robust marketing campaign on a par with the biggest recent blockbusters that went on to become box office smashes in Russia, such as Central Partnership's hits "Legend №17" and "Flight Crew." It's no coincidence that we're presenting our ambitious project at the Russian Pavilion, because it's a platform that has proven highly effective." Dzhanik Fayziev, director and producer, KIT Studio:"We've made an impassioned, energetic, and action-packed film––an incredibly tender, awe-inspiring tale of indomitable courage. As we blended history with the present day, and fantasy with realism, we set our movie amidst virginal Russian nature to tell an emotional and touching story of simple folk who become true heroes when burdened with unanticipated circumstances."The part of Evpatii Kolovrat is played by Ilya Malakov. Until they found him, the casting directors had been auditioning actors for several months, looking for an unfamiliar face perfectly in keeping with the traditional image of a folktale Russian warrior. Ilya Malakov, a Ryazan native himself, has graduated from VGIK, where he studied acting under A.Ya. Mikhailov. Currently employed at the Moscow Guberniya Theatre and Sergei Bezrukov's Theatre, he has also taught choreography at the Ecole Producing Center and Boris Grachevsky's Theatre. The film's producers are certain that this will be his star-making turn. The cast also features such exceptional actors as Timofey Tribuntsev, Polina Chernyshova, Aleksey Serebryakov, Aleksandr Ilin Jr., Aleksandr Tsoi, Andrey Burkovskiy etc.Pavel Stepanov, Central Partnership CEO:"I'm so happy that we've made a big, spectacular, world-class Russian movie. We're proud of our history and our heroes, as well as of the top-shelf computer graphics we have made use of. We're glad to have a chance to present this project at Cannes six months ahead of its wide release, because we have full confidence in its commercial potential both at home and abroad––a claim already substantiated by European and North American sales. It gives us great pleasure to present the film, courtesy of ROSKINO, at the Russian Pavilion, where we can introduce it to an even wider circle of international buyers and distributors."The shooting period spanned late January–late May, 2016. In the former ZiL car factory building in Moscow, reequipped with chroma key green screens, production designers erected numerous sets of princely palaces and ramparts, town gates and bulwarks and nomads' camps, a winter forest and expansive prairie. As Dzhanik Fayziev has pointed out, "Furious" is the first Russian production made fully in chroma key (according to the producer, the movie contains but 4-5 unmodified shots).The crew was staffed by top-of-the-line professionals. Maksim Osadchiy, known for lensing "The Duelist," "Stalingrad," "Dark Planet," "9th Company" etc., served as director of photography. The stunts were coordinated by Aleksandr Samokhvalov from the Action Unit company, responsible for "Flight Crew," "Stalingrad," and "Legend №17.""Furious" is currently in post-production, a stage especially critical for a film so reliant on CGI. Visual effects are managed by the Main Road Post, the computer graphics studio behind the Sochi Olympics opening ceremony in 2014, and such blockbusters as "Stalingrad" and "Attraction." The films' production budget is estimated at $20 million, while the marketing expenses will amount to over 100 million rubles. International distribution rights for "Furious" have already been sold to the USA, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Luxembourg (Splendid), France, Belgium, the Netherlands (ACTEURS AUTEURS ASSOCIES), Spain (Mediaset), and Mongolia (Digital content). North American rights have been purchased by Well Go USA, whose recent successes include the South Korean zombie horror "Train to Busan”. "Furious" is scheduled to come out in Russia on November 30th, 2017.div.tab {padding-left:80px;}ul.enu li {margin:10px 0;}

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Russian Pavilion Kicked Off at 70th Cannes On May 18th, 2017, the second day of the Marché Du Film market and the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the Russian Pavilion opened at Village International to represent Russia at Cannes for the tenth time in a row, serving as a unified info center for our filmmakers and providing a broad platform for promoting Russian cinema in the international arena. The ceremony featured Vyacheslav Telnov, Head of the Cinema Department of the Russian Ministry of Culture; Anton Malyshev,Chief Operating Officer of the Cinema Fund; Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO; Alexander Rodnyansky, producer of AndreyZvyagintsev's "Loveless"; and Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture. Among the guests at the opening ceremony were Russian filmmakers who came to Cannes to present their projects and find partners, as well asfilm festival curators and journalists from Russian and international media, both print and online: Jérôme Paillard, Executive directorof the Marché du Film; Robin Burt, Vice President of the American Film Market; Pavel Stepanov, Central Partnership CEO;Richard Lorber, board chairman and CEO at Kino Lorber Inc.; Leonid Demchenko, Eurimage representative in Russia;Vadim Vereschagin, distribution director at Central Partnership Sales House; Armen Dishdishyan, Vice President forinternational relations at Central Partnership; producers Anastasia Razlogova, Svetlana Kuchmaeva, Yekaterina Mikhailova; Kirill Razlogov,Director of Programming at the Moscow IFF; Fyodor Sosnov, Head of the Analytical Department at the Cinema Fund; investor and producerDavid Gigauri; director Eva Lanska and leading Russian journalists Valery Kichin, Larissa Malukova, Larissa Yusipova,Yevgeniya Tirdatova, Denis Ruzaev, and their numerous colleagues from international media outlets. Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO: "This year marks our anniversary, so it's a special one for us: the Russian Pavilion has opened for the 10th time. The events we started off with have been restructured and reshaped over time, focusing simultaneously on art films and more commercial fare. This year, our program features several events of great interest, including the presentation of a new info resource from the Cinema Fund and the launch of the Moscow Film Commission. Central Partnership and Mars Media will present their new projects, and so will several young directors. As usual, we'll be proud to present our pet project, Global Russians, comprised of five student films by aspiring filmmakers from Russia. ROSKINO wishes all the Russian filmmakers a successful and productive festival."Vyacheslav Telnov, Head of the Cinema Department of the Russian Ministry of Culture: «Successfully managed by a wonderful team led by Katya Mtsitouridze, the Russian Pavilion has opened for the tenth time in a row at the Cannes Film Festival that celebrates its 70th anniversary this year. I'm sure this year the Pavilion team will create perfect working conditions for Russian filmmakers, resulting in signed co-production contracts and sold distribution rights. Of course, I'd also like to emphasize the importance of the Moscow Film Commission launched jointly by the Moscow Cultural Department and ROSKINO. It's a much-needed initiative that the whole film community will benefit from." Anton Malyshev, Chief Operating Officer of the Cinema Fund: "We'd like to thank ROSKINO for giving us a platform for our upcoming presentation: it's a great opportunity to share our plans with the leading journalists from Russia and abroad. We are presenting at the Russian Pavilion a new tracking system for electronic ticket sales. We want to make our market as transparent as possible for people who are willing to invest in our films, who are interested in our film market, and who like Russia in general!" This year, Russian co-productions compete in the festival's two key programs. Andrey Zvyagintsev's "Loveless" and Sergey Loznitsa's "A Gentle Creature"have been selected for the Competition, whereas Kantemir Balagov's "Closeness", the feature debut from a student of Alexander Sokurov, will play in Un Certain Regard. Alexander Rodnyansky, producer of "Loveless": "Cannes is the biggest film event of the year, at least for independent and auteur cinema. It is our dream to make Russia an integral part of this scene. Obviously, our representatives have to have a home of their own where they can gather to talk, exchange ideas, and discuss their works in progress. The Cannes Film Festival is hard to imagine now without the Russian Pavilion––both for those who come here regularly, and those just breaking into the film industry. That's why I'm so happy we've had the Pavilion for the past 10 years. It helps a lot of people, and I value the efforts made by Katya Mtsitouridze and her team. Of course, the results depend on the filmmakers themselves, but having this tool at their disposal certainly makes it easier for them. I hope all the participants will come back here next year more accomplished and acclaimed."At the opening ceremony of the Pavilion, a presentation of the Moscow Film Commission was announced as well. Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture: "For the first time in recent history, the Moscow City Council is presenting its Film Commission at the biggest film event in the world. It's important because state support nowadays implies economical development of cultural institutions. Producers and directors make art, but they're also boosting the industry. Our goal is to create new opportunities to see Moscow, over the next three years, on the movie screens around the world. ROSKINO and the Department of Culture, with the support from Mayor of Moscow, Sergey Sobyanin, have launched the Moscow Film Commission project––a socially-minded, state-funded expert structure meant to help producers and filmmakers to overcome administrative barriers as they film in Moscow. Basically, the Film Commission will be a kind of guardian angel for the filmmakers interested in shooting in the Russian capital."The Russian Pavilion Program 2017:Presentation of the Moscow Film Commission One of the Pavilion's central events will be the presentation of the Moscow Film Commission intended to promote Moscow as a location for film- and TV crews from Russia and abroad, and to create a convenient infrastructure for media professionals working in the Russian capital.Presentation of a new info resource from the Cinema Fund A new info resource from the Cinema Fund will be unveiled at Cannes. For several years now, the Fund has been perfecting its tracking system for movie ticket sales in Russia (ЕАИС). A new project entitled Russian Cinema Fans Analytic will be presented at the Pavilion. Speakers: Anton Malyshev, Chief Operating Officer of Cinema Fund; Fyodor Sosnov, Head of Analytical Department at Cinema Fund."Vega Film" and "Ark Pictures” project showcase "Moscow in Love” is a joint project of "Vega Film" and "Ark Pictures” production companies, realized with the support of the Moscow City Duma and Moscow Government. It will be presented by producer Ekaterina Mikhailova; director Konstantin Fam; Evgeny Gerasimov, Head of the Commission for Culture and Mass Communications of the Moscow City Duma; and Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture.Central Partnership new project showcase A joint Central Partnership and KIT Studio project entitled “FURIOUS” (“KOLOVRAT”) will be presented by producers Pavel Stepanov and Dzhanik FayzievMARS MEDIA and AMEDIA PRODUCTION showcase New project «T-34» produced by Ruben Dishdishyan, Leonard Blavatnik, Nelly Yaralova.«Maison 1618» project showcase The social project “Okay, Mum” will be presented by the director Eva Lanska.GLOBAL RUSSIANS 2017 Presentation The Global Russians program will also be featured in Short Film Corner at the Marché Du Film market. This year’s showreel includes five shorts by alumni of the Moscow Film School, Russian University of Theatre Arts, VGIK, Contemporary Art Institute and the WORDSHOP Communications Academy:GOOD DAY, directed and produced by Olga Dibtseva MILK directed by Daria Vlasova, produced by Yanna Buryak THE FIRST, directed by Lado Kvataniya, produced by Ekaterina KononenkoBREAKING UP WITH JENNY, directed by Petr Antokhin; produced by Nodar Dzhincharadze, Petr Antokhin AMNESIA, directed and produced by Gala Shiyan The films were selected out of 170 applications by a professional jury comprised of film critics Vasiliy Koretsky, Katya Mtsitouridze, and Denis Ruzaev.Presentation of the book «The Cannes Chronicles. 2006–2016» Authors: Daniil Dondurei, Lev Karakhan, Andrei Plakhov. Presented by Andrei Plakhov and Lev Karakhan. The event will be dedicated to the memory of Daniil Dondurei.CLOSENESS (dir. Kantemir Balagov) press-conference. 70th Cannes Film Festival, Un Certain Regard Official Selection Speakers: Kantemir Balagov, director; Nikolay Yankin, producer; Darya Zhovner, actress, female lead. Returning participants of the ROSKINO stand at the Marché du film market include Art Pictures Studio, Central Partnership, Russian World Vision, Indie Vision, Mirsand Ltd., Wizart, Planeta Inform, All Media, Mars Media, Amedia Production, Mosfilm (over 45 production and distribution companies overall). ROSKINO will present at the stand an updated catalogue of DOORS, a mobile film market that showcases the best films made in Russia in 2016–17. All the Russian film companies invited to the Marché du Film market will be united under the auspices of the ROSKINO - RUSSIAN CINEMA WORLDWIDE stand organized by ROSKINO with the generous support of the Russian Ministry of Culture, Department of Foreign Affairs, Moscow City Council, and the largest airline in the nation, PJSC Aeroflot – Russian Airlines. div.tab {padding-left:80px;}ul.enu li {margin:10px 0;}

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Russia at the 70th Cannes Festival and Film Market The Russian delegation's presence at the Cannes Film Festival is managed by ROSKINO with the support of the Russian Ministry of Culture and Moscow City Council. Strategic partnership provided by PJSC Aeroflot – Russian Airlines.THE RUSSIAN PAVILIONFor ten years now, the Russian Pavilion has represented our country at the Cannes Film Festival and the Marché du Film market, serving as a consolidated info center for the Russian filmmakers and providing a broad-based platform to promote Russian cinema in the international arena.An important addition to the Russian Pavilion's work is the presentation of the Moscow Film Commission, aimed at increasing the city's appeal as a location for Russian and international companies producing film- and TV content. The Commission's objective is to create a comfortable infrastructure meant to encourage media professionals to bring their business to the Russian capital. Sergey Sobyanin, Mayor of Moscow:"I'm sure that today's Moscow should be in movies more. We're launching the Moscow Film Commission to facilitate film shootings in the city, and to consult the crews and help them overcome administrative barriers. As early as this year we'll be happy to greet international filmmakers on the streets of Moscow. Welcome!"  The 2017 Russian Pavilion program includes: ●      Moscow Film Commission Presentation Speakers: Vladimir Filippov, Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture; Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO; Evgeny Gerasimov, Head of the Commission for Culture and Mass Communications of the Moscow City Duma; Sigmund Elias Holm, Vice-chairman of AFCI (Association of Film Commissioners International); Arie Bohrer, Head of Advisory Board, European Film Commission Network ; Pierre-Emmanuel Lecerf, Directorate of European & Internationals Affairs, CNC; Valérie Lépine-Karnik, CEO of Film France, the French Film Commission; Michel Gomez, Head of Mission Cinéma Paris. ●      Presentation of a new info resource from the Cinema Fund Speakers: Anton Malyshev, Chief Operating Officer of Cinema Fund; Fyodor Sosnov, Head of Analytical Department at Cinema Fund. ●      Vega Film and Ark Pictures project showcase"Moscow in Love” is a joint project of Vega Film and Ark Pictures production companies, realized with the support of the Moscow City Duma and Moscow Government. It will be presented by producer Ekaterina Mikhailova, director Konstantin Fam, the Head of the Commission for Culture and Mass Communications of the Moscow City Duma Evgeny Gerasimov, the Deputy Director for the Moscow Department of Culture Vladimir Filippov. ●      Central Partnership new project showcase A joint Central Partnership and KIT Studio project entitled “FURIOUS” (“KOLOVRAT”) will be presented by producers Pavel Stepanov and Dzhanik Fayziev ●      MARS MEDIA and AMEDIA PRODUCTION showcaseNew project “T-34” produced by Ruben Dishdishyan, Leonard Blavatnik, Nelly Yaralova ●      Maison 1618 project showcase  The social project “Okay, Mum” will be presented by the director Eva Lanska. ●      GLOBAL RUSSIANS 2017 Presentation.The Global Russians program will be featured in Short Film Corner at the Marché Du Film market. This year’s showreel includes five shorts by alumni of the Moscow Film School, Russian University of Theatre Arts, VGIK, Contemporary Art Institute and the WORDSHOP Communications Academy: GOOD DAY, directed and produced by Olga DibtsevaMILK directed by Daria Vlasova, produced by Yanna BuryakTHE FIRST, directed by Lado Kvataniya, produced by Ekaterina Kononenko BREAKING UP WITH JENNY, directed by Petr Antokhin; produced by Nodar Dzhincharadze, Petr AntokhinAMNESIA, directed and produced by Gala ShiyanThe films were selected out of 170 applications by a professional jury comprised of film critics Vasiliy Koretsky, Katya Mtsitouridze, and Denis Ruzaev. ●      Presentation of the book “The Cannes Chronicles. 2006–2016” Authors: Daniil Dondurei, Lev Karakhan, Andrei Plakhov. Presented by Andrei Plakhov and Lev Karakhan. ●      CLOSENESS (dir. Kantemir Balagov) press-conference.70th Cannes Film Festival, Un Certain Regard Official SelectionSpeakers: Kantemir Balagov, director; Nikolay Yankin, producer; Darya Zhovner, actress, female lead.  Katya Mtsitouridze, ROSKINO CEO: "Thierry Frémaux, director of the Cannes Film Festival, started off this year's press conference with a huge compliment for the entire Russian film industry. One of the most influential curators in the world said that Russian cinema was due for a resurgence. The first competition title he announced was "Loveless" directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev and produced by Alexander Rodnyansky. Of course, we are thrilled by this vote of confidence, but it's no reason to slack off and rest on our laurels. The fact that this year's exceptionally strong competition slate contains three films from Russia is the result of systematic work undertaken both by filmmakers and international promoters. At this year's Cannes, ROSKINO is putting together the 10th edition of the Russian Pavilion. Looking back, it's evident that we've come a long way. Tucked away at first in a corner of la Croisette, the Russian Pavilion now occupies the most prestigious zone of the film market and admits over 2,000 visitors a day. This year's program includes ten events featuring 75 speakers from Russia and abroad."  THE OFFICIAL PROGRAM OF THE 70th CANNES FILM FESTIVAL Andrey Zvyagintsev's “Loveless” (produced by Alexander Rodnyansky, Sergey Melkumov, Gleb Fetisov) will represent Russia in the Competition program. The film, which tells the story of a married couple whose 12-year-old son goes missing in the middle of an acrimonious divorce, is a coproduction of two Russian companies, Non-Stop Production and FetisOff IllusiOn; the French Why Not Productions; the Belgian Les Films du Fleuve run by the Dardenne brothers; and the German Senator Film and Arte France Cinema. A recipient of the Eurimages Co-production Development Award, Zvyagintsev’s latest was also co-financed by the European TV channels ARTE and Canal+, the German broadcasting company WDR, and Cine+. Alexander Rodnyansky, producer of "Loveless":"We are so honored to have our film accepted in the Competition at Cannes, especially on its 70th anniversary! Every year the Cannes selection committee watches about 2,000 submissions, including new films by the world's preeminent filmmakers (Andrey Zvyagintsev now ranks among them too, of course). Yet none of these luminaries are guaranteed a competition slot, of which there are only 20 or less. That's why it's such an honor and a thrill to be included in the most prestigious festival in the world." "Closeness," a debut feature from Kantemir Balagov, Alexander Sokurov’s student, will represent Russia in the Un Certain Regard program. This project was brought to fruition through the efforts of Alexander Sokurov’s Non-Profit Foundation “An Example of Intonation,” the Lenfilm Studio, the Saint-Petersburg Cultural Committee, and the Vladimir Smirnov Social Fund. Alexander Sokurov, who ran a workshop at the Kabardino-Balkaria State University, served as the film's artistic consultant. Set in 1998, the narrative follows the lives of a Jewish family in the North Caucasus region. Their youngest son is abducted, along with his fiancée, by local criminals. The family cannot afford to pay the ransom. How far are they willing to go to save someone they love? Kantemir Balagov, director:"My first trip to Cannes was in 2015, thanks to Alexander Sokurov and Katya Mtsitouridze. My student film "Me First" was selected that year for ROSKINO's Global Russians anthology. The trip was an important one for me both professionally and personally. I'd like to thank ROSKINO in particular for making my stay at Cannes so memorable. They are very responsible professionals. As for my participation in Un Certain Regard, it is, of course, a huge honor. I hope that the inclusion of "Closeness" in the Cannes lineup will help to shift the focus from the central regions of Russia toward the North Caucasus. There's plenty of young talent in small-town Russia." Alexander Sokurov, founder of “An Example of Intonation”, artistic consultant of "Closeness":  "Kantemir Balagov is an alumnus of our Directing Workshop at the Kabardino-Balkaria State University in Nalchik. As a student he made some documentaries and live action films that showed a unique vision and fluency in the medium. All his student films, including his final project “Too Young,” received the highest grades.As a debut feature made with no state support, “Closeness” has been through a lot since the earliest stages. It’s the third feature sponsored by our foundation, but it’s the first time we’ve worked with little to no state funding. Nikolay Yankin, the film’s producer, did everything in his power to finance the picture. Our foundation would like to thank the Lenfilm studio for their generous support." Sergei Loznitsa’s “A Gentle Creature,” co-produced by six countries (the Slot Machine Company and Marianne Slot, with Valentina Mikhaleva, Galina Sementseva, and Lev Karakhan on the Russian side), has been selected for the Cannes Competition. The film is shot entirely in Russian. Based on Fedor Dostoevsky’s eponymous novella in which an elderly pawnbroker marries a young girl, the film is set in today’s Russia. A young woman lives in the outskirts of a small town. The package she sends to her husband, in jail in another town, comes back stamped “Unknown address.” Lost and confused, the woman embarks on a long journey to find out what happened to her husband. The film was co-funded by Arte France Cinema (France), GP Cinema Company (Russia), LOOKSFILM (Germany), Studio Uljana Kim (Lithuania), Wild at Art and Graniet Film (the Netherlands), and Solar Media Entertainment (Ukraine).  Valentina Mikhaleva, Galina Sementseva, Lev Karakhan, producers, GP Cinema Company:“We were so happy to hear that Sergei Loznitsa's “A Gentle Creature” had been selected for the Competition at the 70th Cannes Film Festival. After “In the Fog,” it’s our second collaboration with this outstanding director and his multinational team of producers, who are as invested as we are in the work of such a singular 21st-century talent. We hope Sergei’s new movie, much like his previous documentaries and live action features, will resonate with festival audiences and the general public alike, both at home and abroad.”  THE ROSKINO - RUSSIAN CINEMA WORLDWIDE STAND All the Russian film companies invited to the Marché du Film market will be united under the auspices of the ROSKINO - RUSSIAN CINEMA WORLDWIDE stand organized by ROSKINO with the generous support of the Russian Ministry of Culture, Department of Foreign Affairs, Moscow City Council, and the largest airline in the nation, PJSC Aeroflot – Russian Airlines. Returning participants include Art Pictures Studio, Central Partnership, Russian World Vision, Indie Vision, Mirsand Ltd., Wizart, Planeta Inform, All Media, Mars Media, Amedia Production, Mosfilm (over 45 production and distribution companies overall). ROSKINO will present at the stand an updated catalogue of DOORS, a mobile film market that showcases the best films made in Russia in 2016–17. At the Marché du Film market, Central Partnership will commence international sales for its "Three seconds" and "Frontier." "Going Vertical" (dir. А. Megerdichev) is a new project from the team behind the successful blockbuster "The Crew," scheduled to come out in Russia on Dec 28th, 2017. The film dramatizes an incredible victory won, against all odds, by the Soviet basketball players over the Americans at the 1972 Olympics; it's a story of the athletes as well as their mentors. "Frontier" (dir. S. Tyutin) is Central Partnership's coproduction with the KIT Studio that sheds a new light on WWII. The protagonist's perfect life is turned upside down when he discovers a portal through time. He will transport himself into the war years to fight numerous challenges on his way to true love. Pavel Stepanov, Central Partnership CEO: "We're happy to present these two films in our package. Though completely different, both boast enormous international potential. I can tell from our experience that high-quality Russian filmmaking is gaining more and more traction abroad." At the Marché du Film market, Fedor Bondarchuk and Dmitriy Rudovskiy's Art Pictures Studio will present to international buyers its "Ice" (dir. О. Trofim) and the drama "Buy Me" (dir. V. Perelman). Dmitriy Rudovskiy, producer, co-owner of Art Pictures Studio:"We're happy that Art Pictures Studio has the opportunity to present at the 70th Cannes film market its new projects and organize a number of special screenings for international distributors, including Oleg Trofim's debut feature "Ice" from the people who brought you "Attraction," and the topical social drama "Buy Me" directed by the Academy Award nominee Vadim Perelman." At the Marché du Film market, the Mirsand Ltd. distribution company, on behalf of Bazelevs, will present to international distributors its extensive catalogue along with the fantasy “Dragon” (dir. I. Dzhendubaev), a property that has already proven popular with the Asian moviegoers.  Timur Bekmambetov, directorproducer, Bazelevs:"The Cannes film market is one of the most important film markets of the year, where we can meet with our partners and discuss our pool of upcoming projects. The full CG-animated "Outer Space," created by the CGF studio and Bazelevs based on Alexey Leonov's spacewalk and timed to coincide with the release of "The Spacewalker," will play in the Russian VR Seasons program (Les VR Seasons Russe)." The Russian World Vision company will continue selling “Panfilov's 28” (dir. K. Druzhinin), “Classmates: A New Twist” (dir. D. Suvorov), “Sparta” (dir. N. Kudryashov), “Oil Panting” (dir. O. Taktarov), and “Battalion” (dir. D. Meskhiev). Negotiations will be ongoing regarding “Convoy 48” (dir. F. Popov), which is still in production. Another new project to be presented is a biographical TV series about the famous tiger tamer, “Margarita Nazarova” (dir. K. Maksimov). The Marché du Film market will also be the launching pad for “About Love 2” (dir. N. Saifullaeva, P. Ruminov, N. Merkulova, A. Chupov, R. Gigineishvili, E. Schеlyakin, А. Melikyan), starring John Malkovich alongside Russian actors, and a slew of comedies: “The hangover” (dir. M. Boev), “Yana + Yanko” (dir. N. Merkulova), “Make a Wish” (dir. E. Kravchenko), and the drama “Selfie#Selfie” (dir. M. Boev). Indie Vision, an independent subdivision of Russian World Vision, will present at Cannes its Stage Russia project: some of the best stage productions from the four leading theaters in Russia, filmed in HD and 4K: “Anna Karenina”, “The Black Monk”, “Eugene Onegin”, and “The Cherry Orchard”. The company's lineup also includes Kirill Pletnev's directorial debut, a satire on contemporary Russia entitled “Light Up”. The company will also continue selling “Wake Me Up” (dir. G. Protsenko), “Middleground” (dir. A. Khazanova), and the anthology film “Petersburg. A Selfie”.A returning participant of the market, the Wizart company will present its “Snow Queen 3: Fire and Ice”, the third instalment in the most widely sold animated franchise from Russia released in over 130 territories to date. Another offering of theirs is “Sheep & Wolves”, which played last year in 40 countries and competed at 20 international festivals. The story of a young wolf who literally finds himself in sheep's clothing against his will has climbed the box-office charts in Bulgaria, Turkey, the Baltic Countries, and Mongolia, and now awaits theatrical release in China, Denmark, Norway, and other countries. As a sales agent, Wizart will present a project by the Windmill animation studio, “Fantastic journey to Oz”, already sold to 20 territories.  At the Marché du Film market, the Planeta Inform Group of Companies will present the sci-fi blockbuster “The Coma” by a renowned VFX expert, Nikita Argunov; action fantasy “The Scythian” produced by Sergey Selyanov; and historical epic “Prince Oleg” coproduced by Vladimir Kilburg and Dmitry Litvinov. Anastasia Bankovskaya, Head of Sales at Planeta Inform Group of Companies:"We can’t wait until "The Coma” is finished, not only as the film’s distributors, but also as viewers, because the script promises topnotch entertainment! We are sure that "The Coma" will attract distributors big and small, including the major ones. The first promos of "Prince Oleg" also look very promising. We have substantial experience with historical movies, and we know our target audience. The film won't be ready anytime soon, but this gives us a great opportunity to promote it well in advance. "The Scythian" is a very authentic project and, in our opinion, it provides deep insight into that time period. We have already closed a number of deals on the project, and after the rough cut screening at Cannes, we expect to close all the key territories." Mars Media and AMEDIA Production will join their efforts to give prominence to  “Т-34” (dir. А. Sidorov), a WWII-themed adventure action built around the confrontation between two tank experts, the German captain Jager and lieutenant Ivushkin, a daring escapee from German captivity.   Ruben Dishdishyan, producer:"Т-34” is our biggest project in five years, so the stakes are, understandably, pretty high.  We have now made five movies with Aleksey Sidorov, and I count him among the most gifted writers and directors in the nation. Between Aleksey's first pitch and the first day of shooting, three years had elapsed. All this time, we kept on perfecting the screenplay. Our job was to make our movie as accessible as possible. It had to be spirited, modern, and geared towards different demographics; both a visual feast for the younger audiences who are used to the best Hollywood has to offer, and an exciting character-driven narrative that would please the older generation. I'm sure "T-34" has what it takes to become a must-see." The Maison 1618 studio will present Eva Lanska's social drama "Okay, Mum," whose plot focuses on Natasha, a 12-year-old girl forced to survive, rather than live, in her own family while her parents are constantly at each other’s throats. The father takes it out on the child, and the mother does nothing to prevent it. The girl appeals to her mother, but her cries for help remain unheard. As a grown woman, Natasha takes great pains to avoid following in her parents’ footsteps and to forget her childhood, but ends up making the same mistakes, and her internal dialogue with her mother continues on… Eva Lanska is a writer and a social activist, who has so far published four works of fiction. Eva Lanska, writerdirector:"Childhood memories are the sweetest, most vivid, most tender. But everything changes when children grow up too soon. "Okay, Mum" was filmed in a single burst of creativity. Over the 14 minutes of its running time, there isn't a pause, a look, or a gesture that has no meaning; even the sizes and colors of spaces the characters occupy matter in this drama. The cast and crew grew into a unified whole for the duration of the shoot. For several days, a child's eyes "became" the camera lens. The film lets us see the pain of having survived a family conflict through the eyes of an adolescent, filtered through a child's perception. I hope that the Cannes presentation will allow us to go ahead with the feature-length version of this story."The MOSFILM studio will present at Cannes the historical drama “Anna Karenina. Vronsky's Story” adapted by Karen Shakhnazarov from Tolstoy's eponymous novel and Vikenty Veresaev's "The Japanese War." Sergei, Anna's grown son, has been struggling for years to understand what drove his mother to tragedy. Nor is she forgotten by the disconsolate Count Vronsky, not even 30 years later. In 1904, after a skirmish in the Russo-Japanese war, Sergei Karenin and Aleksey Vronsky end up in the same remote village in Manchuria. Fate has given them a chance to come to terms with the past and find, at last, some answers.   Karen Shakhnazarov, director:"Our life revolves around male-female relationships, while all the rest, including politics and art, is secondary. No one has expressed it better than Leo Tolstoy. I've been meaning to make a movie about love for a long time, and what can be more stimulating than an adaptation of "Anna Karenina"? As far as I'm concerned, nothing better has been written on the subject, and nothing ever will. That's why the part about the relationships between Anna, Vronsky, and Karenin is extremely faithful to the novel: I didn't change either the plot or the dialogue." Elizaveta Boyarskaya, actress, plays Anna Karenina:"For me, the novel is the story of a young woman's first true love. We're used to thinking that Anna Karenina is a wise, experienced woman, but it is not so. When she dies she's only 28 years old..." Maksim Matveev, actor, plays Count Aleksey Vronsky:"Aleksey Vronsky is the product of a certain social condition, brought up in a certain way to uphold certain views... For me, Vronsky is a little boy whose ideas about family life were pretty narrow..." The All Media company will present at Cannes the historical drama “Sobibor” starring Konstantin Khabenskiy and Christopher Lambert. Based on a true story, the film recounts the selfless heroic feat accomplished by a Soviet officer, Alexander Pechersky, who masterminded a mass escape from the Nazi death camp Sobibor that operated in Poland in 1942-43. The company's other projects include the fantasy “The Last Knight” (dir. D. Dyachenko) and the thriller “Selfie” (dir. N. Khomeriki). Additional info:Jane KovalenkoROSKINO Press Office info@ekovalenko.com+7 916 131 10 00 

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